Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Americans thrown a curveball by a pandemic by Mary Ellis


The Covid-19 epidemic has affected everyone during 2020. Many have seen family members fall ill and in some cases, die from this insidious virus. Others have lost jobs and are suffering financial hardship through no fault of their own. Even if your family wasn’t as direly impacted, no one has gotten away unscathed. Graduations, baptisms, showers and weddings cancelled, dreams put on hold. We’re no longer allowed to play proper respect at funerals. Schools have been closed with the responsibility for education thrust upon parents. Parks, playgrounds, pools, amusements, theaters, and sports facilities shuttered. We haven’t been allowed to meet a friend for lunch, get a haircut, or attend our place of worship. I am not implying the shutdown wasn’t necessary, especially since my husband and I are “of a certain age” with serious medical conditions. But now that restrictions are lifting, I’ve come to three observations about American personalities.

We are impatient by nature. We can follow the rules for only a certain length of time. After that we want everything to go back to normal, myself included. We might be able to survive three months without a haircut, but not six. My British friends are still under lock-down and thriving better than my neighbors here. A summer without block parties? A fall without football? No hayrides, no Christmas caroling, no taking grandkids to see Santa at the mall? Enough is enough.

We don’t mind suggestions, but please don’t tell us what to do. We are far more independent than the rest of the world. If you observed the streets of Paris or Rome after lockdown was imposed, not a “creature was stirring.” Not the case in many parts of the US.

We don’t like living with uncertainty. We want definite answers and solutions to our problems. We don’t like all these ideas being tossed around regarding treatments or possible vaccines. Are masks good or bad or somewhere in-between? Everyone has an opinion but no one seems to have an answer.

God has the answer. God knows how this will play out and asks only that we trust Him and be patient. Not just for the month or June or the rest of summer, but until we feel safe again. And I know just how hard that can be.

These were my opinions. Please leave me a comment with yours.  You will be entered in a drawing for a copy of The Amish Sweet Shop, recently nominated for a National Readers’ Choice Award. You must leave an email address, US or Canada only. Happy Reading, Mary Ellis

Mary’s latest book is Island of Last Resorts. : Cut off from the outside world on a private island, can a crack team of investigators solve a cold-case murder before a rich madman picks them off one-by-one?


21 comments:

  1. We need to get back to the golden rule. Basically, do unto others like you would like others to do to you. Which means to respect one another. How drastically it was apparent after this crisis hit that that rule had gone out the window. People were fighting over bottled water and a roll of toilet paper!

    In times past and in most countries, the elderly are regarded as honored for the time they have been on this planet and the deeds they have accomplished during that time. Now it seems that they are tossed to the side and forgotten. When at first this virus seemed to be hitting the elderly, so many of the young people seem to think well it’s time for them to die any ways. In my opinion, a country’s reputation is how they treat the very young and the elderly.

    During all of this, I think we have been awakened to the appreciation to many people that we before took for granted. A teacher’s job don’t seem so easy any more. Postal workers, store clerks and delivery people are cheered for showing up for work when once they were ignored. Why did it take an epidemic to bring this appreciation to the forefront? Shouldn’t we be thankful for them all the time?

    Talk about learning the value of family and loved ones – just be told you can’t be around or see them. I’ve learned to never take for granted having them around. The human being needs physical contact – be it a hand shake, a hug from a sibling or a kiss from and grandchild. I hope we take away from all this the value of saying “I’m sorry”, “I love you”, “Great to see you”, “Can I help you”.

    Thank you for the chance to win a copy of “The Amish Sweet Shop”. It’s on my TBR list and I’d love the opportunity to read it. Shared everywhere and hoping to be the fortunate one selected.
    2clowns at arkansas dot net

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    1. Thanks so much for posting profound comments about the elderly, teachers, postal workers and others. I hope our faith and The Golden Rule will get us through this.

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  2. My opinion on the pandemic is that I don't want to be told where to go, what to do, what to wear, how to live, etc. by anyone. Many of the elected officials have king/queen complexes and have used this as an opportunity to become dictators. But, ultimately, God is in control and will see us through so that is what I trust. Thanks for the chance to win a cooy of your book. It's on my TBR list. Boxtopscrazy at gmail dot com.

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    1. Thanks so much for taking the time to comment. God is only one we can trust!

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  3. The COVID-19 Pandemic has been character building. I doubt that any of us would have voluntarily chosen this form of character building, but since we didn't have a choice, we may as well make the best of it. As an introvert, I enjoyed isolation at the beginning. I cleaned out drawers, caught up on my sleep, read lots, had my own exercise regime going, etc. I even Zoomed with others for my ladies' Bible study, Sunday school classes, and Weight Watchers meetings. However, eventually I craved contact with my adult friends. One of the most special events was the reopening of our church, where we could worship with others and fully participate in the music, communion, and the fellowship. We did so with masks except while spaced and the service was in progress. Take-out meals from time to time were great, but I loved when we could once again actually go to the little Chinese restaurant we love. It's never crowded, and we knew they'd space us away from others. While I don't enjoy being told what to do, I am happy to wear a mask to keep others from catching any germs I may have and to avoid catching COVID-19. Everyone's health, especially among my age group, is more important than my pride or preferences. I do understand that some people have breathing or maybe psychological conditions that make wearing a mask unwise, but then they probably need to stay at home. I've loved seeing my husband rise to the occasion and spend 3 mornings per week since mid-March handing out groceries to needy families as they drove by at a mission. I've accompanied him once a month to take groceries to elderly (as we are) shut-ins. He and I walk for 30 minutes after dinner every evening that weather permits. We've experienced inconveniences since mid-March and can now appreciate the sacrifices and deprivations experienced by those in wars. I've been praying for those who have lost loved ones or had the dreaded virus in this pandemic and those who have lost jobs and businesses. For these the pandemic has been much more impactful. susiesellner at gmail dot com

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    1. Thanks so much for an insightful and well thought out reply. I pray God keeps you and family safe during this challenge.

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  4. tough times for people
    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

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  5. I believe we have to do what is right for us as a individual. I know like in covid some can wear mask some cannot. Lot can go wrong when someone healthy wears them. I know from personal experience. This whole thing has gone political. So sick of it. So my decision is to watch out dg ir me and my own health. joeym11@frontier.com

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  6. It is all very frustrating and has become more political than I think it should or needs to be. I prefer to talk books - and yours sound great.

    amy bradsher at gmail dot com

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  7. Yes, this COVID-19 has turned our world upside down! There are so many "reports" on social media (I don't own a tv) and whose report are we going to believe? I shall believe the report of The LORD! Thanks for an opportunity to win a book! :) Badawson16 at aol dot com

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  8. Amen, Mary. I wear masks when I go out in public, not for me, but for other people--just in case I might have Covid and not know it. To me, it's respect for others.

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  9. So much uncertainty in the world these days. I don’t trust lots of the news but I do know I can trust God. He’s in control of everything including Satan.
    tumcsec(at)gmail(dot)com

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  10. You are spot on with your observations about our reactions to all of these crises this year. We need the Lord to give us hope and peace! Thanks for the giveaway opportunity.

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  11. You nailed it, outstanding observations and comments. It's gratifying every time someone makes the effort to speak or write good sense. Thank you!

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  12. This whole thing makes me terribly sad. Realizing just how far from God people have become by compromising their beliefs to be politically correct is heartbreaking. We need to humble ourselves and pray for healing.

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  13. In one sense I realized how selfish I can be. I want to be able to go and do as it was before covid. On the other hand, I am a healthcare worker, although I am furloughed still, I understand the reasoning for masks. I think everyone should be wearing one if they are able to while in public. I think we can open up more if people did wear a mask. Restaurants being the challenge as you can’t eat while wearing a mask. I get frustrated when people refuse to wear one because of their rights. What people don’t understand is wearing a mask helps protect others. But if everyone wore one the spread of covid is decreased significantly. That’s just my two cents. Thank you for the opportunity to win this book. Blessings to all.

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    1. Forgot to put my email. janeen dot bair at gmail dot com

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  14. I think you need to do whats necessary to keep your loved ones and even strangers safe during the time that you know a problem is going on. Most people I see out are not wearing a mask. I do wear one. I don't think this is a time to be selfish and complaining about a little inconvience. Thanks for the chance to read it.

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  15. God is still on the throne! marybears2004@yahoo.com

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  16. It's so sad so many things have been canceled(Even out concert to see Chris Tomlin!) We can't go anywhere or see anyone. That's not a life God would want us to have. Some places in our state still haven't opened up and now the government is talking about another shut down. Like I said before it's pretty sad!
    duellonlysis(at)aol(dot)com

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  17. What I have noticed - Americans have become self-centered instead of selfless. It's a very sad state we are in.

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