Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Meet Natalie Walters, author of Living Lies


Today I'm interviewing fellow Revell author Natalie Walters about her debut novel, 
Living Lies 

If you had to describe yourself in one sentence, what would you say?
Tea loyalist, who loves her family fiercely, and enjoys traveling so long as I have a plan.

Tea loyalist, huh? I'm an Earl Grey gray! What do you do when you’re not writing? Any interesting hobbies?

Reading. Traveling. Spending time with my family. I don’t think I have any real hobbies necessarily but I do love trying new recipes.

What was your favorite book as a teen or child?
Ramona Quimby first, and then The Babysitter’s Club. I no longer have the books and am currently hunting them down in thrift stores. I think I have five of the BSC out of 150 or something. Long ways to go!

Interesting choices. Tell us three things about yourself that might surprise your readers.

I dislike surprises very, very much.

I used to read the encyclopedia as a child, for fun. The entire set. Then moved on to the dictionary.

Folding laundry is my favorite household chore.

Surprises, as in the waitstaff singing happy birthday to you at a restaurant? I get you, girl! What is the most valuable piece of advice you’d like to give to unpublished authors?
Read outside your genre. I’ve learned so much about setting description, story structure, and character and plot development by reading historical, fantasy, contemporary, and even non-fiction. It’s a game changer and almost as important as reading books on craft.

This is your debut novel. What would you like readers to know about your story?

Living Lies began as a character-driven story (normally I’m plot driven) with Lane Kent. I began writing her personal story before the plot began developing as a way to deal with some of the things happening in my real life surrounding mental health. The truths Lane learns in this story are the very things I wanted spoken into the life of my own child.

I was very touched by Lane's depression. While it doesn't touch me, I have several good friends who suffer from it. What’s next from Natalie Walters?

Deadly Deceit releases in November 2019 and brings readers back to Walton and into the lives of Deputy Ryan Frost and reporter, Vivian DeMarco. This dynamic duo are forced to work together as they investigate the untimely death of another journalist leading them on a twisted hunt for someone called the Watcher.

Back cover copy:

In the little town of Walton, Georgia, everybody knows your name—but no one knows your secret.

At least that’s what Lane Kent is counting on when she returns to her hometown with her five-year-old son. Dangerously depressed after the death of her husband, Lane is looking for hope. What she finds instead is a dead body.

Lane must work with Walton’s newest deputy, Charlie Lynch, to uncover the truth behind the murder. But when that truth hits too close to home, she’ll have to decide if saving the life of another is worth the cost of revealing her darkest secret.

“A nail-biter that will make you play hooky from your day job, feed your children cereal for supper, and not stop reading until the last page.”—Jaime Jo Wright, author of The Reckoning at Gossamer Pond and the award-winning The House on Foster Hill

“Natalie Walters has masterfully woven an emotionally charged suspense and love story. It’s the perfect book for the avid romantic-suspense reader.”—DiAnn Mills, author of Burden of Proof, www.DiAnnMills.com

Bio

Natalie Walters is a military wife who currently resides in Hawaii with her soldier husband and their three kids. She writes full-time and has been published in Proverbs 31 magazine and has blogged for Guideposts online. Natalie comes from a long line of military and law enforcement veterans and is passionate about supporting them through volunteer work, races, and writing stories that affirm no one is defined by their past.

You can purchase Living Lies at:


Do you think most people understand depression? Leave a comment for a chance at winning Living Lies. Be sure to leave your contact information in the comment! (Winner will be announced in the comments Tuesday night.)

63 comments:

  1. First of all, I live in Walton County GA. So my interest is already peaked since your story is set in Walton GA. Second of all, I love that cover of your book. It makes me want to open it! Third of all, yes, depression is something I deal with. I take meds to control it. My mother refused counseling and meds because she thought they were no "Godly". It was extremely challenging to grow up in that environment and eventually as an adult become her caretaker for the last 6 years of her life. I have also had a close friend attempt and not succeed at taking her own life. Depression is all around us and we need to end the stigma and address it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How sad that your mom believed what she did. I so agree that we need to end the stigma!

      Delete
    2. Hi Nancy! Thanks so much for stopping by! I’m sorry your mom felt the way she did. I agree with you, the only way to end the stigma is to address it.

      Delete
  2. And my email address is nancydarby2007@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Lydia Hinkle
    csilyd@gmail.com
    Thank you so much for this opportunity!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I do not believe that most people understand depression. The stigma is so great surrounding it that most people do not receive the help they need. I wish we could all be more sympathetic and supportive of each other to help each of us be the best version of us regardless of what we deal with. Depression doesn’t define what a wonderful person you are.
    Traesmama@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I so agree Misty. Unfortunately, a lot of people thing a person who is depressed can simply snap out of it if they really wanted to. And that's not the case at all. I guarantee if they could, they would. No one wants to live with depression.

      Delete
    2. Hi Misty!! Thanks so much for stopping by! I couldn’t agree with your last statement more! Depression doesn’t define anyone and I really hope opening up the conversation will allow those dealing with the illness to know they are loved and supported.

      Delete
  5. I don't think we understand depression mostly because in our society we're suppose to pull up our boots and carry on. Quite an interesting topic...looks like a fantabulous read!
    cluedn@embarqmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Tammy, society does believe that and if a depressed person could pull up their boots and carry on, they would.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for stopping by, Tammy! You’re right, that sort of mindset is really hard for someone who’s dealing with mental health illnesses. We need to be more supportive and understand they cannot just “fix” themselves and carry on.

      Delete
  6. I don’t think people really do understand depression because there still seems to be a stigma about that. I think better education of the general public would be a great start to turning this around.
    perrianne (DOT)askew(AT)me(DOT)com
    Perrianne Askew

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Education would help, but unless you or someone you love lives with depression, it's hard to grasp just what it does to you.

      Delete
    2. Hi Perrianne! So good to see you here. Education would be a wonderful start!

      Delete
  7. No people who have never had a clinical depression absolutely cannot understand it. I few years ago I went through a period of depression where dying sounded good to me. Thank God He delivered me from it. Stella dot potts77 at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I understand, Stella. While I wouldn't kill myself, death would have been a relief. But as my favorite scripture says..."and it came to pass...."

      Delete
  8. Hi first of all I loved this interview and I loved reading what this book is about! Thank you both for sharing this. I actually don't think a lot of people understand depression, especially the ones that are going through it. It is so sad that a lot of people are misunderstood because they don't understand it. People should learn more about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alicia! Thanks for stopping by! It’s such a hard illness to understand but I really hope having simple conversations about it will turn the tide and allow people to learn more.

      Delete
  9. Because depression and other mental illness is so taboo in our society there are many people who refuse to seek the help they need. If only we could look at it as it is, a disease the same as diabetes or cancer. Nobody bats an eye when you are being treated for a physical ailment and the same should go for mental illness.
    This book looks fantastic and I can’t wait to read it. Thanks for the interview and the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for stopping by, Katie!! I couldn’t agree with you more! We must look at it like any other illness. Until then, people will continue to live in fear of speaking up.

      Delete
  10. I don't think people understand depression and that is unfortunate. I wish mental illnesses were treated with the same compassion that physical illnesses are treated!I am looking forward to reading this new book and enjoyed learning about the author, Natalie!
    mjscoffee@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So do I. These have been some great comments! Thank you all.

      Delete
    2. You’re absolutely right! Mental health illnesses are just that—illnesses. We need to support those suffering so they can get the treatment they need.

      Delete
  11. Natalie Walters has been trying to comment on the blog, but for some reason Blogger won't let her. :-/

    ReplyDelete
  12. I don't think a lot of people understand depression Thank you for a chance to win your book! SARAHTAYLOR601973(at)YAHOO(dot)Com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you're correct, Sarah. Hopefully someday this world will have more compassion and understanding.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for stopping by, Sarah! I’m really hoping that the more we talk about it the more we can diminish the stigma and lack of understanding.

      Delete
  13. not as much as they should
    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. Sometimes you have to go through something before you can have compassion for it and I wouldn't wish depression on anyone!

      Delete
    2. Very true. It wasn’t until we were facing it ourselves that we learned the truth behind the illness and the stigma. Heartbreaking but I’m hopeful that having conversations about the illness will bring healing.

      Delete
  14. I don't think that people really understand depression or anxiety disorders. It is hard to understand something you have never personally experienced. I have already added your book to my TBR list! Thank you for a chance to win.
    lhanberry1 at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, Linda. Living Lies is a great book!

      Delete
    2. Thanks so much for stopping by, Linda! I appreciate you adding Living Lies to your TBR list ☺️ I agree that it’s hard to understand what you don’t know. I’m hoping my book will reveal some insight into the illness and open up conversations of understanding.

      Delete
  15. I'm not sure if most people understand Depression. I suffer from Depression and each day it is a battle I have to fight.I do take medication for it but it does not completely help . Thank you for this chance to win. 1cow0993(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a friend who suffers from it as well and it took me a long time to realize if she could shake herself out of it she would. You never know what someone is going through unless you walk in his shoes.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for stopping by, Carol! Mental health illnesses are so difficult to understand and it’s my hope that the more we talk about the more we can help support those struggling with the illness.

      Delete
  16. No I don't believe most people understand depression. Some hide it very well. jrs0350@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree that some hide it very well. Thanks for stopping and commenting.

      Delete
    2. Hiding it seems to be the biggest obstacle for those suffering and it’s why I believe we need to open up conversations so those struggling can speak up and get the help they need.

      Delete
  17. Personal experience tells me that most people do not understand depression, nor do they understand the medications typically used for depression and other mental health issues. Sadly, there are those in the Christian community who often lack understanding and make statements that worsen the whole situation.

    Like Carol T., I too have been battling depression for a very long time. Medication helps but does not cure. It is a daily battle. One thing I have learned is that God is just a breath away; He is with me even when I can’t feel him through the fog that is depression.

    ljshuck1961@verizon.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And it is a fog, Laura. And I hate it when someone tells another person if you just had more faith...I literally want to strangle them, but I don't. God gave us the ability to create medicines that help.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for stopping by, Laura! There’s so much to learn about mental health illnesses and the medications are a huge component of that. There are no easy or quick fixes like many would assume and the journey can be long with setbacks. I love that you lean into God and I pray you will always feel loved and supported.

      Delete
  18. No, I don't believe most people understand it, even the people that are depressed. Thank you
    isisthe12th(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, Linda. It is a hard subject to understand.

      Delete
    2. Hi Linda, thanks for stopping by! I agree with you. When those struggling have a hard time understanding it, it only makes it harder for those NOT struggling to make sense of it.

      Delete
  19. There are so many aspects of depression that it’s hard to understand any. My stepdaughter was diagnosed with bipolar depression in her thirties. I never fully understood it and she passed away at 41. I take medication for depression and it was worse after my mom passed away. She lived with us her last year and I was her caregiver. Some days are better than others.
    tumcsec(at)gmail(dot)com
    I’ve heard so many good things about this book especially from Jaime Jo Wright.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, Gail. And sometimes the medicine has its own side effects. Hope today is a good day for you!

      Delete
    2. Hi Gail! Thanks for stopping by! Mental health illness has many nuances and it would be hard to understand everything. I really hope the main thing we begin to learn is how to support and love those dealing with it in an unconditional way. Praying for you to have more good days than bad 💗

      Delete
  20. I think it's hard for us to understand the depression others are going through. It's a different journey for all those involved. Just try to listen, be aware and keep the lines of communication open.
    marypopmom (at) yahoo (dot) com
    Merry

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Merry! Thanks for stopping by! You’re SO right—being there and listening is huge for those suffering. Often times they feel like people want to “fix” them or their problems but the illness is much bigger than that.

      Delete
  21. Jessicarodriguez101@gmail.comMay 30, 2019 at 1:16 PM

    I have immediately family that suffers from mental health disorders. When have been made to feel unwelcome at our old church and pushed out. We muster have been "sinning" and God was punishing us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jessica, thanks for stopping by!! I’m SO very sorry to hear this! Sadly, our family has experienced that rejection within a church setting and it was devastating. On that day I had to turn back to God’s truth which was Jesus loved everyone, illness, sin, and all—enough to die on the cross. That church did not represent Christ’s love. I pray you’ve found the right church home and that you feel love and supported.

      Delete
  22. Most people do not understand depression or any type of mental illness.

    psalm103and138atgmaildotcom

    ReplyDelete
  23. No, I don't think people don't truly understand depression unless they have been through and struggled it. My sister has had it many years and, although I had compassion, I didn't really get it. Until I went through a bout of it. I managed to get through it after 6 months or so but it definitely changed my outlook on it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So agree, Dawn. While I have compassion for anyone suffering from depression, since I've never been clinically depressed, I don't know what it feels like. But I have seen friends suffer from it.

      Delete
  24. No, I don’t think you truly understand unless you have experienced depression. I enjoyed the interview. Blessings

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Natalie did such a good job describing what someone with depression deals with. Thanks for stopping by Lucy.

      Delete
  25. Thanks for the interesting interview. Would love to win a print copy! Take care now. Ps. 91.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting.

      Delete
  26. And the winner of Living Lies is Laura S!

    ReplyDelete