Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Spilling the Tea on a Few Mystery Room Settings—Linda Kozar




Jason Meechum believes he is leaving behind a shady past when he takes on a new job at a boutique tea farm where his surly sister has risen to the rank of the owner's most trusted employee. But his job title soon expands as murder and intrigue infuse the dark halls and hidden secrets of Moseley Manor.

PUT YOUR NAME IN THE HAT TO WIN THIS EBOOK TODAY!





TEA AND INTRIGUE



I absolutely love writing mysteries. The characters. Crimes. Clues. Red Herrings. Intrigue. And the settings. In fact, I love the settings so much, the dedication to my latest Sweet Petite Mystery reflects my passion.


                         Dedication
To all the secretive sitting rooms, cryptic drawing rooms, and dusty-tome’d libraries in every creepy mansion in every mystery I’ve every loved.

Let's look into the origin of these three rooms. 

The Sitting Room

A room in a home or hotel where people can sit down and relax.

From "The Funeral Museum" Houston, Texas, A Mourning Sitting Room or Parlor.
It was thought during Victorian times that if a person were to look at his or her reflection in a mirror shortly after a death in the household, that person would also die.

The Parlor

A sitting room in a private house.

From the Frank Lloyd Wright House in Oak Park, (Chicago, Illinois)

The Drawing Room (Wikipedia)


drawing room is a room in a house where visitors may be entertained. The name is derived from the 16th century terms withdrawing room and withdrawing chamber, which remained in use through the 17th century, and made their first written appearance in 1642. In a large 16th to early 18th century English house, a withdrawing room was a room to which the owner of the house, his wife, or a distinguished guest who was occupying one of the main apartments in the house could "withdraw" for more privacy. It was often off the great chamber (or the great chamber's descendant, the state room or salon and usually led to a formal, or "state" bedroom.


The Victorian Library (Victoriana Magazine, Victorian Library)

"On the second story of this ostentatious mansion, beyond, and connecting with the gentleman's dressing-room, was the requested library. This would be a cozy little apartment, containing a bay-window and an alcove for books, separated from the main room by a transom, beneath which curtains were hung, shutting off the alcove entirely when the new owner, pretending to be somewhat of a literary man, desired seclusion." Victoriana Magazine, Victorian Library


Linda Kozar, Author
www.lindakozar.com 
Leave a comment if you'd like a chance to win the short story eBook, Roses are Red, Violet is Blue


16 comments:

  1. Thanks for clarifying what each room is for! I love cozies. paulams49ATsbcglobalDOTnet

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    1. Paula, thanks! These are my favorite rooms in mystery novels, with the exception of secret rooms and secret passages. Those are the best! I've added your name to the hat.

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    2. Paula! You are the winner of Roses Are Red, Violet Is Blue! Since you have already provided your email address, I'm sending your copy right now! Congratulations!

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  2. You're a new author to me; the book sounds great! Thanks for the tutorial on the rooms - how fun!
    mindyhoung AT msn DOT com

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    1. Hi Mindy! Glad to meet you. Besides my Sweet Petite mystery series, I have my full-length mystery "Until the Fat Ladies Sing" series and a whole lot of other books. I've entered your name in the drawing.

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  3. I love the name. Thank you for a chance to read something from a new author to me.
    lhanberry1 AT gmail DOT com

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  4. Linda--yes, I love your name too! Glad to meet you!

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  5. Sounds good! I'd love to have my name put in the hat nut I don't have an ereader.

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  6. Beverly, can you read books on your cell phone? Or laptop? That's another option available. I'm putting your name in the hat:)

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  7. I love cozies and this one sounds great!

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    1. Thanks Patricia. This is a seasonal series of Sweet Petite Mysteries from 6,000-7,000 words, based on twelve different holidays we celebrate during the year. I've had a blast doing them and my readers sure enjoy them if sales mean anything:)

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  8. Very interesting post. Interesting how rooms were used in Victorian times. Would love to read the book.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  9. Very interesting post. Interesting how rooms were used in Victorian times. Would love to read the book.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  10. Thanks Diane! You're names in the hat!

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  11. I love cozy mysteries. I loved Strands of Fate and am looking forward to reading more of the books you have written. This one sounds great. This information about the different rooms is wonderful. Thanks for sharing it. Thanks for the chance to win this story.
    debbiewilder(at)comcast(dot)net

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  12. I enjoyed reading the differences. Thanks for sharing!
    Blessings,
    Connie
    cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

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